Coffee Talk: About by my book’s heroine

Hecate (Cate) from Gods Behaving Badly, reminds me of me when I was her age. Cate is full of self-doubt and angst, and always uses sarcasm to avoid getting hurt. She is also very empathetic, though again this aspect of her personality is wrapped in a very hard shell.

Coffee Talk
Coffee Talk

Cate knows what the right thing is to do and she wants to do the right thing. But, she recognizes that playing the part of a savior can become addictive and quite burdensome. What happens if she fails to save someone she loves? What happens if the person who is danger isn’t worth saving? How can she fight for someone else’s soul when she can’t even save her own? Can she really go up against her family–these gods and creatures of magic and capriciousness?

I think these are all questions that anyone of any age can identify with and I think that’s what makes this story appealing.

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Writer’s Block

I deal with writer’s block in a couple of ways. I often am working on multiple books or stories, so if I’m having writer’s block with the current project, I just turn to one of my other books. Sometimes I just need a break to “miss” my characters. My second technique is the strangest. I will take a break from writing and then as I’m going through the day, I imagine what my character’s response would be to the tasks I’m accomplishing. For example, in my recent novella, Gods Behaving Badly, my character Cate is very socially stunted and pithy. I will try to imagine how that character would react to having to clean the house (she’s a hoarder, so you can imagine) or how she might react to a tuna salad for lunch (she loves it!) Weird, but it definitely works for me!

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Gods Behaving Badly. . .

“Throughout the ages I had been known by many names.  Aries’ whore.  Bacchus’s muse.  Goddess of witchcraft and magic. Hekata. Hecate.

Cate was what I called myself.

Even after almost eighty years, I still hadn’t recovered from my fall from grace. It had made me ordinary. Not quite human, but ordinary, nonetheless. I had an apartment. I paid rent. And, when I could afford it, I even ate.
I didn’t know if I was fooling myself, but I still believed that if I could carry on like this for another hundred years, Hades would keep his promise and I would get my soul back. But, already, the world had crushed me.  I was tired of the rankness that greeted me each time I rode the subway and I was tired of enduring the human tendency to inquire about my well-being.”
-Gods Behaving Badly (Book One)

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